Advanced Certification in Teaching Management

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Enrolled: 13 students
Duration: 111 Hours
Lectures: 56
Level: Level 4 - Adv. Diploma

Description

Teaching is a tremendously rewarding job, but it requires exceptional communication, social, and time management skills in addition to postgraduate teacher training. If you are considering a future as a teacher and want to make a difference in the lives of young people, this online teaching credential will provide you with the practical knowledge and training necessary to advance your career.

This Advanced Certification in Teaching Management course requires no prerequisites and is meant to provide an overview of teaching, with an emphasis on primary school and early childhood education. Additionally, there will be a portion on SEN teaching to assist you in developing a knowledge of how to teach children who have special educational needs such as dyslexia or ADHD. You will learn how to construct lesson plans, become acquainted with various teaching styles, and gain knowledge about teacher compensation, among other things.

This teacher training course is appropriate for people interested in becoming acquainted with the English educational system and the role and duties of teachers. No prior teaching experience is necessary to enrol in this online course, which will increase your job prospects once you earn your qualified teacher certification (QTS).

Who is this course intended for?

  • Educators interested in enhancing their interactive teaching courses.
  • Individuals with an interest in teaching and research.

Course Requirements

  • This course is open to learners of all academic backgrounds.
  • The qualification is open to learners aged 16 and over.
  • This course requires a working knowledge of the English language, numeracy, and ICT.

Assessment

  • At the conclusion of the course, you will be expected to take an online multiple-choice examination.
  • The minimum grade to pass is 60%
  • Your test will be evaluated automatically and promptly, so you will know immediately if you passed or failed.
  • No worries, you have two chances to pass this certificate.

Certification

  • After passing the test, you will be entitled to earn a Certificate of Achievement.

Why should you select us?

  • Study resources for e-learning that are affordable, entertaining, and of excellent quality;
  • Tutorial videos/materials created by industry thought leaders;
  • Study on an intuitive, cutting-edge online learning environment;
  • Exam systems that are efficient in terms of assessment and quick result generation;
  • Access to course materials through mobile, tablet, or desktop from any location and at any time;
  • Career growth chances are advantageous;
  • Student support is available via email 24 hours a day.

Certification path

The Advanced Certification in Teaching Management is a valuable certificate to have, as it would benefit the following careers:

  • Guidance
  • Counselor
  • Educator
  • Mentoring / Tutoring
  • School Administrator
  • Special Education Teacher

(Course Code 101)

101 - Module 1: Fundamentals of Teaching

1
101-1-1 Re فيcognize the Development of Children and Adolescents
4 Hours
From birth to maturity, children are constantly growing, developing, and learning. Social, emotional, intellectual, physical, and language developmental milestones can be used to track a child's progress. Because all children and adolescents develop in a similar manner, the order in which each child goes from one milestone to the next will be about the same. Each child, however, develops at a different rate, and their development may not progress uniformly throughout all areas. As a result, child development teaching approaches should strive to target all of the developmental areas at the same time.
2
101-1-2 Communication and Professional Relationships with Pupils and Family
3 Hours
Working with children, adolescents, families, and caregivers requires effective communication. It promotes trust and encourages people to seek advice and use services. It is essential for building and maintaining relationships, and it is an active process that includes listening, inquiring, understanding, and responding. You should constantly communicate with them in a way that is appropriate for their stage of development, specific circumstances, and needs.
3
101-1-3 Safeguarding the Welfare of Children and Young Person
3 Hours
This part provides a hands-on introduction to child and adolescent safety. Along with advice on how to be safe in various scenarios, it also includes basic information on developing a safeguarding policy.

101- Module 2: Teaching in UK

1
101-2-1 Teaching in the United Kingdom
1 hour
The school system in London and the United Kingdom allows teachers a great deal of freedom in terms of where they can work. The bulk of Teach Away employment are in England, notably in the greater London area. Many teachers opt to supply teach when they first arrive to obtain experience and a sense of the many types of teaching assignments. The British curriculum is simple and easy to learn, allowing international teachers (Canadians, Australians, and New Zealanders) to get up to speed quickly.
2
101-2-2 Teachers’ Standards in the United Kingdom
1 Hour
Teachers prioritise their students' education and are held accountable for upholding the highest possible standards of performance and conduct. Teachers act with honesty and integrity; they have good subject knowledge, they keep their knowledge and abilities as teachers up to date, and they are self-critical; they form constructive professional relationships, and they work with parents in the best interests of their students.
3
101-2-4 English Educational System
2 Hours
Pre-school education is accessible in England for children aged two and up through nursery schools and playgroups. From the age of three, all children are eligible to up to six terms of free early education (and there is a government commitment to extend the provision to two-year-olds in the future).
4
101-2-5 School and teacher evaluations
1 Hour
The method of evaluation and monitoring utilised in English schools is comprised of three major components. The first is Ofsted (the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services, and Skills), an independent government agency tasked with inspecting schools and issuing reports based on their findings.
5
101-2-6 Governance of Schools
1 Hour
All schools in England are governed by a governing board made up of members chosen from among the parents and employees, members appointed by the Local Authority, members appointed by the church or charitable foundation that owns the school grounds, and members appointed from the community (e.g. local businesses).
6
101-2-7 Inclusive Education
1 Hour
With a growing emphasis on equality, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) today, we should reconsider our teaching and interact with the learning requirements of all students by implementing inclusive pedagogies.

101- Module 3: Education for Teachers

1
101-3-1 Section One — Getting Started
1 Hour
Whether you are planning to be a professional trainer or you do some training as part of your employment, you will want to be prepared for the training that you undertake.
2
101-3-2 Section Two – Training and Facilitation Fundamentals
1 Hour
You may be asked to deliver training or to facilitate a debate of ideas, depending on the needs of your participants. This lesson will assist you in determining which technique is appropriate in a given situation. What exactly is training?
3
101-3-3 Section Three – Materials Acquisition
1 Hour
Recognizing what your participants need, want, and expect, and then responding accordingly, is an important feature of your training. This lesson will look at some methods for determining your participants' requirements and adapting your presentation accordingly.
4
101-3-4 Section Four – Lesson Planning
1 Hour
A lesson plan is an outline that can help you stay on track while also providing you with a variety of possibilities. While the lesson plan serves as a guide for how you will handle a specific workshop, a well-designed lesson plan will also allow you to significantly improve your training.
5
101-3-5 Section Five – Activity Selection
1 Hour
For many people, understanding comes through doing. People attend training expecting to learn, and one of the best ways to assist them do so is to create activities that support the learning objectives while also allowing for some type of engaging activity and development.
6
101-3-6 Section Six – Workshop Preparation
1 Hour
Being prepared is a sign of a professional trainer. Being unprepared might derail your training before it even begins. To help you give effective and memorable training, use the concepts and approaches in this session.
7
101-3-7 Section Seven – Getting Off to a Good Start
1 Hour
Begin the session on the right foot by being prepared to greet attendees as they arrive. They are as interested in you as you are in them. They will also warm up to you if you are prepared and greet each one as they arrive. Participants are greeted Greetings are essential for starting your training on the proper foot.
8
101-3-8 Section Eight — Delivery Techniques and Suggestions
1 Hour
We are continually exploring for methods to help participants succeed through a period of self-discovery in instructor-led, participant-centered learning. This is not to say that we never lecture; in fact, brief lectures are sometimes the most effective way to deliver new knowledge.
9
101-3-9 Section Nine – Maintaining Interactivity
1 Hour
A trainer leads interactive participant-centered training, but you might wonder why you are there because things are going so well! This is an indication of strong programme design and that participants are taking ownership of their learning.
10
101-3-10 Section Ten – Managing Difficult Participants
1 Hour
Training involves people who, as we have seen, come to class for a variety of reasons and motives. Prepare for behaviours that may disrupt your training plan in order to continue providing successful instruction. Understand that these challenging behaviours can come from a wide range of learner types and personalities.
11
101-3-11 Section Eleven – Tackling Difficult Subjects
1 Hour
Some aspects of training will be difficult, but you will overcome them because you are a professional. You might be requested to facilitate a delicate subject, or you might find yourself halfway through a presentation and realise you have hit a nerve and need to change your material.

101- Module 4: Teaching Techniques

1
101-4-1 Chapter 1
1 Hour
We build schools in which we aim to develop whatever capabilities or qualities an individual may have in order for him to become an intelligently participating member of society.
2
101-4-2 Chapter 2
2 Hours
The primary issue to be answered after agreeing on the purposes of education, the goals toward which all instruction must strive, is, "What have we to work with?" "What is the foundation on which children begin their lives?" Specific definite effects are possible given a certain nature; but, if nature differs, the results must inevitably differ.
3
101-4-3 Chapter 3
2 Hours
Attention must be present wherever consciousness is. One cannot exist in the absence of the other. Most psychologists use the term attention to describe the form awareness takes, referring to the fact that consciousness is selective. It simply means that consciousness is constantly focused and marginal–that some thoughts, facts, or sensations stand out more than others, and that the presence of this "perspective" in consciousness is a mechanical adjustment.
4
101-4-4 Chapter 4
2 Hours
In its most basic form, habit is the inclination to do, think, or behave in the same way that one has done, thought, or performed in the past. It is the proclivity to repeat various activities. It is the propensity that causes one to choose to perform a familiar action over a novel one.
5
101-4-5 Chapter 5
2 Hours
The general laws of association regulate both. They blend into one another, and what one could term habit, another might call memory for the same reason. Their similarities outnumber their differences. However, there is some justification for addressing the matter as if its similarities outnumber their differences.
6
101-4-6 Chapter 6
2 Hours
The same broad laws of association govern imagination as they do habit and memory. The emphasis in the previous two subjects was on achieving the intended outcome without regard for the form of that result.
7
101-4-7 Chapter 7
2 Hours
The term "thinking" has been used almost as loosely and to signify almost as many diverse things as the term "imagination." Even now, there is no agreement on what thinking entails.
8
101-4-8 Chapter 8
2 Hours
Appreciation falls within the umbrella of feeling rather than knowing. The factor that distinguishes appreciation from memory, imagination, or perception is a powerful one. Any of these mental states can exist without the state being grateful. However, appreciation does not arise as an elementary condition in and of itself; rather, it is a complex–a feeling tone following and colouring a mental state or activity.
9
101-4-9 Chapter 9
2 Hours
All human activity can be divided into three categories: play, labour, and drudgery, but what activities fall under each category and what each phrase means are debatable. The fact that the boundaries between the three are blurry and imprecise, and that they gradually blend into each other, is undeniably true; however, play differs from labour, and work differs from drudgery.
10
101-4-10 Chapter 10
2 Hours
It has been mentioned here and there in previous chapters that, despite the fact that there are specific laws guiding the many mental features and processes, there is still variety in how those laws work. It was stated that persons differ in the type of memory or imagination in which they excel, as well as in their capacity to communicate.
11
101-4-11 Chapter 11
2 Hours
Morality has been defined in a variety of ways. It has been described as "the organisation of activity with reference to a system of fundamental values," as "the regulation and control of immediate promptings of impulses in conformity with some prescribed conduct,"
12
101-4-12 Chapter 12
2 Hours
Formal discipline or training transfer is concerned with the question of how far instruction in one subject, following one route, influences training in other subjects. How far, for example, training in mathematical reasoning helps a child to reason in history, morals, and household administration; how far memorising gems of poetry or historical dates aids memory when applied to learning stenography or botany; and how far paying attention to the gymnasium ensures attention to sermons and social engagements.
13
101-4-13 Chapter 13
2 Hours
The activities that teachers execute in their classes do not usually include simply one type of mental work. It is true, however, that various lessons tend to focus on one type of action in particular. There are teachings that want to primarily fix habits, some that seek to mostly engage inductive reasoning, and still others that seek to largely involve deductive thinking or appreciation.
14
101-4-14 Chapter 14
2 Hours
Both teachers and students have used the term "study" rather loosely. When used by teachers, it typically signified something entirely different from what youngsters intended when they used it. Furthermore, teachers have frequently used the phrase in conjunction with mental tasks that, technically speaking, do not fall within that category. As a result, there has been a great deal of uncertainty and a lack of efficiency in the workplace.
15
101-4-15 Chapter 15
2 Hours
The achievement of the children measures the teacher's success or failure in applying the principles presented in the prior chapters. Of fact, the same type of assessment could call into doubt the validity of the principle that we have attempted to establish.

101- Module 5: Teaching Psychology

1
101-5-1 Why Do Children and Adolescents Lack the Ability to Study Properly?
2 Hours
Without a doubt, everyone can recollect odd techniques of study that he or she or someone else used at some point. During my high school years, I frequently studied aloud at home with several other temporary or permanent members of the family.
2
101-5-2 The Study’s Scope And Major Factors
2 Hours
Our physical motions are usually in response to some kind of need. For example, a person who wishes to reach a certain place, play a specific game, or create the foundations for a house makes the movements required to attain the intended goal. Even greater physical activity stems from a more or less definite sense of need.
3
101-5-3 Provision for Specific Purposes As A Considered Factor
2 Hours
The scientific investigator is accustomed to using hypotheses of some kind as guidance in his inquiries. Many renowned men who are not scientists follow and promote an approach of study that is somewhat comparable to that of scientists.
4
101-5-4 Supplementing Thought
2 Hours
The prior chapter emphasised the need of learning with clear goals in mind. These are the goals that the learner aspires to achieve through the study of a text or other subject area. They are an important type of supplement to whatever assertions may be supplied for study because they are not normally contained in such stuff and must be conceived by the learner himself.
5
101-5-5 The Organization of Ideas
4 Hours
In numerous areas of knowledge in primary school, it is typical for teachers to assign nearly equal weight to diverse facts. This is true, for example, in spelling, where a mistake counts the same regardless of which word is misspelt. In writing, this is mostly true.
6
101-5-6 Judging The Soundness And General Worth Of Statements
3 Hours
As we have seen, proper study entails a great deal of responsibility on the learner. Instead of allowing him to be a haphazard collector of facts, it requires him to identify specific reasons for which the data may be useful.
7
101-5-7 Memorizing
4 Hours
In other words, there would be no object relevance in reading, reflection, travel, or experience in general if such experience could not be later recalled and enjoyed and utilised. Thus, the lack of reference to memory thus far does not imply a lack of awareness for its worth. There will never be a time when a low estimate will be remembered.
8
101-5-8 The Application of Ideas
3 Hours
When the student has discovered some of the closer relationships that a topic bears to life; when he has supplemented the author's thought; when he has determined the relative importance of different parts and given them a corresponding organisation; when he has passed judgement on their soundness and general worth; and when, finally, he has gone through whatever drill is required to fix the ideas firmly in his memory.
9
101-5-9 Provision For A Tentative Rather Than A Fixed Attitude Toward Knowledge
3 Hours
In various ways, a rigid attitude toward facts and conclusions is damaging. The following examples demonstrate how significantly it interferes with the utility of information.
10
101-5-10 Individuality
3 Hours
There was a period when people seemed to take pride in their lack of self-esteem. They were sceptical of all natural instincts, believing in utter depravity, and the crushing out of powerful desires appeared to be no bad. Obedience to another's will was the one supreme virtue, and its attainment required the eradication of human nature, the extinction of self.
11
101-5-11 School and children
3 Hours
True or logical study is not a meaningless mental activity or the passive reception of ideas for the sake of having them. It is the vigorous application of one's mind to a subject in order to satisfy a felt need. Instead of being aimless, every effort made is an organic step toward the accomplishment of a specific goal; instead of being passive, it necessitates the self's reaction to the ideas presented, until they are supplemented, organised, and tentatively judged, so that they are well retained in memory.

101- Module 6: Teaching Students with Special Needs (SEN)

1
101-6-1 A Brief Overview of Special Educational Needs (SEN)
1 Hour
Children learn at different rates and in diverse ways in any classroom. Teachers will organise their courses and select various types of lesson materials to help each child learn the best way possible.
2
101-6-2 Recognize Constructivism in the Classroom and Your Teacher Role SEN Code of Conduct
1 Hour
How do we acquire knowledge? We marvel at the amount of learning that has allowed a small child to understand her increasing world as she grows from infancy to toddlerhood.
3
101-6-3 SEN Code of Conduct
2 Hours
The SEN Code of Practice 2001 has recently undergone a complete redesign, which began with numerous consultations in 2010 and ended in the revised SEN Code of Practice ('CoP') 2014 on July 28, 2014.
4
101-6-4 Acquire Knowledge about SENCO Classroom Management Strategies for Children with Disabilities
1 Hour
Strategies for Classroom Management Inclusion is a wonderful thing. Children with special needs are no longer segregated in "Special Ed" classrooms and are only visible on the playground or in the lunchroom.
5
101-6-5 Pupils with Physical Disabilities, Sensory Disabilities, and Cognitive Impairments
2 Hours
There is a vast range of physical disabilities (PD), and those impacting students span the entire ability spectrum. Some students are able to access the curriculum and learn effectively without the use of supplemental educational resources. They have a disability but do not require special education.
6
101-6-6 How to Deal with Students Who Are Autistic
2 Hours
Every child has the right to an appropriate education that is free of charge. Autistic children, on the other hand, would require special care and tactics to be taught. Autistic children are children who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).
7
101-6-7 Recognize and Address Learning Difficulties
2 Hours
When children learn and understand new things slower than their peers, they are said to have learning disabilities or learning difficulties. Speech and language skills, social skills, and motor skills are among the many that might be harmed.
8
101-6-8 Methods for Managing Anger in Students with Special Needs
1 Hour
Everyone feels irritated at times. Active intervention is more difficult than preventing angry outbursts. Here are a few strategies for both preventative and active anger management.
9
101-6-9 Educating Down Syndrome Children
1 Hour
Children with Down syndrome have both strengths and drawbacks when it comes to learning development.
10
101-6-10 Conclusion of SEN
1 Hour
Every Special Educator should have the following SEN supplies in their classroom.

Assessment

1
101 Advanced Certification in Teaching Management – Final Quiz
10 questions
Advanced Certification in Teaching Management
Price:
EGP3,800 EGP2,500
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